1127 S Home ave Oak Park_Design
1127 S Home ave Oak Park_Design2
1127 S Home ave Oak Park_Interior
1127 S Home ave Oak Park

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 

Existing building is a 2-story single-family residence in the Craftsman style with Queen Anne influences built in 1905. The structural system is frame. The foundation is stone. Exterior walls are replacement asphalt shingles. Original wood siding is likely underneath asphalt shingles.

The building has a high front gable roof clad in replacement asphalt shingles. There is one side right, side slope, concrete block chimney. Windows are replacement wood and aluminum clad wood, 1/1 double-hung sashes. Aluminum-clad mulit-lite casements in front porch. There is a single-story, full-span enclosed porch characterized by a hip roof clad in asphalt shingles.

GUNDERSON HISTORIC DISTRICT (FIRST)

This Single-Family Residence like most of the single-family Gunderson homes are American Four-Square types constructed in 1905. They are individualized with original detailing of Colonial Revival, Arts & Crafts, Queen Anne, or Prairie style influence. Although the massing is consistent on all the homes, there are many variations of detail on the homes throughout the district, including roofs, bays, and siding.

The American Four-Square houses in the district are illustrative of the variety of secondary styles that often accompany the style. Most have strong horizontal lines, restraint in ornamentation, and wide eaves. Some of these features are strong enough to be considered the influence of the Arts & Crafts and Prairie School styles.

The American Four Square played a critical role in speculative developments throughout the United States; they were basic, comfortable homes affordable by the middle-class from 1895-1925. The typical American Four-Square home in the Historic District is slightly longer than the standard square floor plan.

Some are graced with a classical flair, often manifested in Ionic or Corinthian capitals on round porch columns. This building style is considered a distinctive new building style from the turn of the century. While many of the homes in the district do contain other stylistic components, their massing, floor plate, and window patterns are essentially the same.

Bibliography and Resources

Historic resources of Oak Park https://www.ruskinarc.com/oakpark/oakpark/Gunderson1 The Village of Oak Park Historic House resources https://www.oak-park.us/villageservices/planning-preservation-zoning/historic-preservation

Frank Lloyd Wright Heritage Trail. Oak Park, Thatcher Woods Area Council, 1993  Cummings, Kathleen Roy. Architectural Records in Chicago. Chicago, 1981  Brooks, H. Allen. The Prairie School. New York, 1972. 

Fields, Jeanette S., ed. A Guidebook to the Architecture of River Forest. Chicago, 1981  Fleming, John, Hugh Honour, Nicholas Pevsner. The Penguin Dictionary of Architecture.  Guarino, Jean. Oak Park -- A Pictorial History. St. Louis, 1988. 

Harris, Cyril. Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1975.  Hasbrouck, Wilbert R., AIA, and Paul E. Sprague, Ph.D. The Hasbrouck--Sprague Survey of Historic Architecture in 0ak Park. Oak Park, 1974. 

McAlester, Virginia, and Lee. A Field Guide to American Houses. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1984. 

Phillips, Steven J. The 0ld House Dictionary: An Illustrated Guide to American Domestic Architecture 1600 to 1940. Lakewood, Colorado: American Source Books, 1989.  Sanderson, Arlene, et al. Ridgeland Revealed: Guide to Architecture of the Ridgeland-Oak Park Historic District. Oak Park, 1993. 

Shoppell, R. W., et. al. Turn-of-the-Century Houses, Cottages and Villas. New York (Dover), 1983. 

Sprague, Paul E. Guide to Frank Lloyd Wright and Prairie School Architecture in Oak Park.

Oak Park, 1976. 

Steiner, Frances H. Frank Lloyd Wright in Oak Park and River Forest. Chicago, 1983. 

Steiner, Frances H. Victorian Oak Park. Chicago, 1983. 

Stickley, Gustav. Craftsman Bungalows. New York (Dover), 1988. 

Stickley, Gustav. Craftsman Homes. New York (Dover), 1979